English-biz site is excellent for writing tips

The links open to pages with a whole lot of links and it’s easy to be overwhelmed with so many ideas. Just look for what you NEED right now to enhance your writing.

http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/mainguides/poetrythesis.htm

http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/downloads/readapoem.pdf

 

http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/mainguides/analysis.htm

 

http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/downloads/analysis.pdf

 

http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/downloads/examessayskills_gcse.pdf

 

A Horse and Two Goats – story produced as a mini-film

This video really captures the hardship and struggles of Muni’s existence.

I hope you find that it aids in your understanding of the text.

 

http://www.malgudidays.net/2008/12/malgudi-days-episode-2.html

 

The other episodes are Narayan’s stories converted to a film series. Those of you studying The English Teacher might find this useful in understanding Nayaran’s cultural orientation.

Could this be a word to describe Krishna in The English Teacher?

Check out:

http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2011/02/15.html

uxorious

http://sp.dictionary.com/dictstatic/d/g/speaker.swf \ uk-SOR-ee-us; ug-ZOR- \  , adjective;
1.
Excessively fond of or submissive to a wife.
Quotes:
It is batty to suppose that the most uxorious of husbands will stop his wife’s excessive shopping if anexcessive shopper she has always been.
— Angela Huth, “All you need is love”, Daily Telegraph, April 24, 1998
Flagler seems to have been an uxorious , domesticman, who liked the comfort and companionship of awife at his side.
— Michael Browning, “Whitehall at 100”, Palm BeachPost , February 22, 2002
Fuller is as uxorious a poet as they come: hiatuses inthe couple’s mutual understanding are overcome withsuch rapidity as to be hardly worth mentioning in thefirst place (“How easy, this ability / To lose whateverwe possess / By ceasing to believe that we / Deserve such brilliant success”).
— David Wheatley, “Round and round we go”, The Guardian , October 5, 2002

ux·o·ri·ous

http://sp.dictionary.com/dictstatic/d/g/speaker.swf [uhk-sawr-ee-uhs, -sohr-, uhg-zawr-, -zohr-]

–adjective 

doting upon, foolishly fond of, or affectionately submissive towardone’s wife.
Origin:
1590–1600;  < Latin ūxōrius,  equivalent to ūxor  wife + -ius -ious

—Related forms

ux·o·ri·ous·ly, adverb
ux·o·ri·ous·ness, noun
un·ux·o·ri·ous, adjective
un·ux·o·ri·ous·ly, adverb
un·ux·o·ri·ous·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2011. 

Reviews of The English Teacher

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/196743.The_English_Teacher

http://www.amazon.com/English-Teacher-R-K-Narayan/dp/8185986037/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1297651389&sr=8-2

http://books.google.com/books?id=1XWvFjvqWXQC&lpg=PP10&ots=JvZqQk4csJ&dq=r%20k%20narayan%20the%20english%20teacher&lr&pg=PA54#v=onepage&q=r%20k%20narayan%20the%20english%20teacher&f=false

if the google books link is a bit long, if it gives difficulty check it out through google books:

Four great Indian English novelists: some points of view

By Kaushal Kishore Sharma

Go down all the way to pages 40-54

It’s a rather decent discussion of the novel

 

a critique of Narayan’s style:

http://ariel.synergiesprairies.ca/ariel/index.php/ariel/article/viewFile/1727/1686